Issaquah Reporter: “Cougar/Squak Corridor Park south expansion opens to the public”

June 10, 2015, Issaquah Reporter: “Cougar/Squak Corridor Park south expansion opens to the public”

 

 

Daniel Nash of the Issaquah Reporter wrote a great article about the opening of the new Cougar/Squak Corridor Park and discussed how Dave Kappler of the Issaquah Alps Trail Club and our grassroots organization, Save Squak, were instrumental in stopping the proposed logging of Squak Mountain and sparking the creation of this new park.

In November 2012, Kappler found out from others in the community that the old Issaquah Highlands Recreational Club had been purchased by Erickson Logging Inc.

Over the subsequent half-year, the company applied multiple times with the state Department of Natural Resources to harvest the land’s timber, some of which were accepted. However, the Trails Club and grassroots organization Save Squak continued to lobby King County to purchase the land.

The county didn’t have immediate funds to purchase the land, but the club and Save Squak attracted the attention of the Washington Trails Association and The Trust for Public Land.

The Trust for Public Land eventually made a deal in July 2013 to purchase the land on behalf of King County for $5 million. King County acquired the land in December 2014 after completing repayment to The Trust for Public Land.

Read the full Issaquah Reporter article by clicking here.

 

Issaquah Reporter: “County, Trust for Public Land complete Squak Mountain property deal”

January 19, 2015, Issaquah Reporter: “County, Trust for Public Land complete Squak Mountain property deal”

The Squak Mountain property should be open to hiking in the springtime. — image credit: Issaquah Reporter file photo

King County and The Trust for Public Land are taking the last few steps in a two-year-long journey to permanently preserve more than 200 acres of Cascade foothills forestland.

Coveted for its ecological value, including sheltering the headwaters of a salmon-bearing stream, 226 acres of land on Squak Mountain was purchased by the trust in 2014 for $5 million.

“Permanently preserving forestland in our Cascade foothills will pay dividends for each generation to come,” said King County Executive Dow Constantine. “By saving wildlife habitat and preserving recreational areas, we protect our region’s environmental health and quality of life.”

King County Councilmember Reagan Dunn, whose district includes the land, noted “protecting this stretch of land guarantees recreational opportunities and natural habitats will be preserved for years to come.”

“Successes like Squak Mountain are at the heart of our mission to give everyone a great park close to home,” said Paul Kundtz, Washington State Director of The Trust for Public Land. “It’s been intensely rewarding to be able to work with the great team at King County and achieve this wonderful outcome for the people of Issaquah.”

Click here to read the complete article in the Issaquah Reporter.

Issaquah Reporter: “Something to celebrate | Squak Mountain supporters come out to view part of the new land acquisition”

May 13, 2014, Issaquah Reporter: “Something to celebrate | Squak Mountain supporters come out to view part of the new land acquisition”

Excerpts from Linda Ball’s article on the May 10 celebration.

From left, Elizabeth, Esme and Jay McNally, with Ann Fletcher enjoying the hike on Squak Mountain. Peeking from behind Jay McNally is Oliver McNally. — image credit: Linda Ball/Issaquah & Sammamish Reporter

by LINDA BALL,  Issaquah Reporter Staff Writer

Outdoor enthusiasts, county officials, members of SaveSquak.com, representatives from the Trust for Public Lands and King County Parks officials gathered Saturday morning at the old lodge that was once part of the Issaquah Camping Club, to officially celebrate the acquisition of 226 acres into the King County Parks system.

Kevin Brown with King County Parks said the actual planning effort will begin later this year to improve the trails — some of which have been there over 20 years — and to figure out how to fold it into the open park space for Cougar and Tiger Mountains.

Deputy County Executive Fred Jarrett was at the celebration instead of executive Dow Constantine, because Constantine and his wife had just welcomed a new baby the day before. Jarrett said the acquisition was one of Constantine’s goals.

“It’s about delivering value and adding to our public space,” Jarrett said.

Jarrett said this was brought together in record time, noting that there was a great deal of interest in preserving the land due to concerns of flooding from potential clear-cutting and development and also disturbing fish habitat and wildlife. Jarrett thanked King County’s Parks staff for making it possible for “all to enjoy for eternity.”

District 9 County Council member, Reagan Dunn, a key driver behind the acquisition, could not be present due to another obligation. Larry Phillips, who represents District 4 on the county council, said Tibbetts and May Creeks are very important salmon habitats, which they have had great success with. He said now they don’t have to worry about clear cuts filling up those streams.

The Trust for Public Lands, a national non-profit, played a key role in the acquisition. Roger Hoesterey, senior vice president and division director west, oversees the TPL’s conservation programs in every state west of the Rockies, including Alaska and Hawaii. During his time at TPL, the states he directs have conserved over a half million acres of land. TPL put up the money to buy the property from landowner Kurt Erickson. King County has repaid TPL for about half of the property, with plans to pay off the rest before the end of the year. The purchase price was $5 million.

Hoesterey thanked Erickson, who wasn’t there, saying that Erickson probably could have made more money if he’d logged and developed it. He said this property was a high priority.Hoesterey also thanked Save Squak.

“They did all the hard work,” he said. “We need the rabble-rousers.”

The final speaker was Dave Kappler, president of the Issaquah Alps Trails Club, and one of the so-called rabble-rousers. He thanked members of the King County Council.

David Kappler, president of the Issaquah Trails Club speaks, while Kevin Brown with King County Parks looks on.

“We didn’t have a lot of meetings (Save Squak), but then Reagan Dunn showed up at Issaquah City Council,” Kappler said. “Larry Phillips has his name written over everything that’s green.”

Kappler said they were sort of out of their league on the whole thing.

“The people on Save Squak were great. They knew when to cool it when we needed to cool it,” he said.

….

Click here to read the complete article in the Issaquah Reporter.

Issaquah Reporter: “Done deal — Trust for Public Land and Kurt Erickson come to terms on Squak Mountain.”

July 23, 2013, Issaquah Reporter: “Done deal | Trust for Public Land and Kurt Erickson come to terms on Squak Mountain.”

Issaquah Reporter’s Linda Ball reports the successful negotiations between Trust for Public Land and Erickson Logging to acquire the Squak Mountain forest lands for King County:

An agreement has been reached between logger Kurt Erickson and the Trust for Public Lands, for TPL to preserve 216 acres of forestland that Erickson owns, on Squak Mountain, following several months of negotiations between the parties.

King County Executive Dow Constantine and The Trust for Public Land (TPL) announced the agreement, signed July 18, to purchase the forestland for $5 million.

“This is forest that people have cherished for generations and which, thanks to the partnership of The Trust for Public Land, will no longer be threatened, forever to be enjoyed and appreciated,” Constantine said.

Erickson said he would have preferred to keep the property, but he said it was great to get this over with.

“I want people to know that I worked to cooperate,” Erickson said. “It was a big driving force to cooperate for everyone to be happy.”

He said he understood both sides of the issue. The residents of Squak Mountain wanted the property to remain as it is to avoid issues of flooding and erosion — but he said he views his work as a craft.

“TPL worked hard to get it right,” Erickson said.

Click here to read the entire article at the Issaquah Reporter.

 

Issaquah Reporter: “State disapproves of latest application to log Squak”

June 12, 2013, Issaquah Reporter: “State disapproves of latest application to log Squak”

Issaquah Reporter’s Linda Ball reports on the Washington Department of Natural Resource’s decision to deny a new logging permit clear cut Squak Mountain. Reporting on the legal ruse cooked up by Erickson Logging to pose as a small family logging operation:

The Department of Natural Resources stated in its response to logger Kurt Erickson’s most recent application to log only on the top of Squak Mountain, that it “believes the landowner/applicant is an alter ego of other persons or entities that do own 500 acres within 50 miles of saltwater. The landowner/applicant claims it owns less than 500 acres within 50 miles of saltwater and thus is not subject to the critical habitat trigger for marbled murrelets. Therefore, more information is needed to assess the potential marbled murrelets habitat at the site.”

Click here to read the full article in The Issaquah Reporter.

Issaquah Reporter: “Squak Mountain saved | Trust for Public Land to rescue Squak Mountain”

May 8, 2013, Issaquah Reporter: “Squak Mountain saved | Trust for Public Land to rescue Squak Mountain”

Issaquah Reporter’s Linda Ball covers the move by King County and TPL to save Squak Mountain from clear cutting:

Just in the nick of time, King County executive Dow Constantine and the Trust for Public Land have signed a conditional agreement to purchase the 216-acres owned by Erickson Logging, Inc. on Squak Mountain, saving the pristine forest from logging.

This news could not have come any sooner since the Washington State department of natural resources had approved the revised forest practices permit for Kurt Erickson late last week, giving him the green light to log 95 percent of the 95 acres he proposed to log in his second application.

The approval was troubling to members of the grass roots organization Save Squak, because the state DNR did not consider comments from the King County Department of Permitting and Environmental Review regarding flooding in the May Creek basin. According to Bruce McDonald with the DNR, harvesting timber is not considered to cause the creation of an impervious surface.

Click to read the full article in The Issaquah Reporter.

Issaquah Reporter: “A view from top — Committee tours Squak Mountain”

May 2, 2013, Issaquah Reporter: “A view from top | Committee tour Squak Mountain”

Issaquah Reporter’s Linda Ball covered last weekend’s hiking tour of the proposed logging area on Squak Mountain by the King County Conservation Futures Citizens Committee and King County Councilman Reagan Dunn:

The King County Conservation Futures Citizen’s Committee, had a close up look at Squak Mountain Saturday, April 27.

“They went into some of the forest, and got a good sampling of the area,” said Dave Kappler, the president of the Issaquah Alps Trails Club.

As an extra bonus, Kappler said they had a great view that day, all the way to the Olympic Mountains.

The committee, led by Terry Lavender, serves as an advisory board, making recommendations on land purchases to the King County Council. Also on the tour were County Council member Reagan Dunn along with Ingrid Lundin and Dave Tiemann, project managers with King County.

The tour gave Dunn, Lundin and Tiemann the opportunity to see that Squak Mountain is the missing link between Tiger and Cougar Mountains, Kappler said. Dunn is supportive of the efforts of Save Squak and the trails club to stop the potential clear-cut of 95 acres on the mountain.

Click here to read the full article

Issaquah Reporter: “Erickson files for new logging permit on Squak Mountain”

Apr 8, 2013, Issaquah Reporter: “Erickson files for new logging permit on Squak Mountain”

Issaquah Reporter’s Linda Ball has a great article in Monday’s issue about Erickson Logging’s resubmission of a permit to clear cut part of Squak Mountain. She brings new information to light:

  • Erickson intends to file another permit later to clear cut the remaining parcels
  • Erickson concedes he will need to do a study to determine if the endangered Marbled Murrelet is present since a DNR review has revealed the proposed logging area is a potential nesting area
  • The DNR will extend the public comment period to 30 days from the filing of the permit application instead of the 15 days stated in the application

Save Squak’s own Helen Farrington was quoted in the article, noting that this past weekend’s heavy rains caused May Creek to rise one and a half feet, much of it due to run off from the proposed logging area.

Click here to read the full story in the Issaquah Reporter.